Computing

Computer Science

 

AS and A Level Computer Science

Aims and Learning Outcomes

The aims of these qualifications are to enable learners to develop:

  1. an understanding of and ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, with less emphasis on ICT
  2. the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs to do so
  3. the capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  4. the capacity to see relationships between different aspects of computer science
  5. mathematical skills
  6. the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

AS Level Assessment - OCR Specification H046

The content of the AS Level is divided into two components:

  1. Computing principles component (01) is assessed in a written paper (worth 50% of the total AS Level) recalling knowledge and understanding.
  2. Algorithms and problem solving component (02) relates principally to problem solving skills needed by learners to apply the knowledge and understanding encountered in the Computing principles component. It is assessed in a written paper (worth 50% of the total AS Level).

Both AS and A Level pupils sit the two exams at the end of year 12.

A Level Assessment - OCR Specification H446

The A Level builds directly upon the AS Level adding new content to components 01 and 02. These components are then both examined in written papers, each worth 40% of the total A Level. Additionally component 03 (worth 20% of the total A Level), the Programming Project, is introduced. This is a practical portfolio based non-exam assessment with the task chosen by the teacher or the pupil.

Both exams are taken at the of year 13.

What careers would this course be useful for?

These qualifications are suitable for learners intending to pursue any career in which an understanding of technology is needed. The qualifications are also suitable for any further study as part of a course of general education.

These qualifications will provide learners with a range of transferable skills which will facilitate personal growth and foster cross curriculum links in areas such as maths, science and design and technology. Computer Science is a very creative subject and skills such as problem solving and analytical thinking will all be refined and explored as learners progress through the learning and assessment programme. It is ideally suited for future careers such as; app developer, website developer, CGI programmer, computer game developer/designer, embedded systems engineer, digital artist, network manager/technician, manufacturing engineer, data analyst.

What are the entry requirements?

Students are required to have a C grade in GCSE Maths or GCSE Computer Science.

Where can I find out more information?

Both exam specifications may be found at:

http://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-computer-science-h046-h446-from-2015/

Alternatively contact, Mr Endacott or Mr Morrison.

 

GCSE Computer Science

Aims and Learning Outcomes

A GCSE in Computer Science will encourage learners to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation.
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs.
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically.
  • understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society.
  • apply mathematical skills relevant to Computer Science.

Assessment - OCR GCSE (9-1) Specification (J276)

The content of the GCSE is divided into three components:

  1. Computing systems component (01) is assessed in a written paper worth 40% of the total GCSE, taken at the end of year 11.
  2. Computational thinking, algorithms and programming component (02) is assessed in a written paper worth 40% of the total GCSE, taken at the end of year 11.
  3. Programming project component (03) is a practical portfolio based non-exam assessment worth 20% of the total GCSE and is completed in year 11.

What careers would this course be useful for?

This course feeds directly into the Computer Science AS or A Level. For suitably as a career see the A Level section.

Where can I find out more information?

Both exam specifications may be found at:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse-computer-science-j276-from-2016/

Alternatively contact, Mr Endacott or Mr Morrison.